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Friday, December 27, 2013

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Get the Right Start With Your New Phone

By Agent Derek M

Getting a new phone is fun. Whether you bought it for yourself or it was given to you by a loved one, firing up a new handset is one of the true joys of our wireless world. At some point, all phones seem restrictive after you use them for a while. A brand new phone frees you to get some new wallpapers, better ringtones and those cool apps your old device couldn’t handle. Then, of course, there is the wonderful new phone smell…

But hold on there a sec. Sometimes, in the excitement of getting a new phone going, it’s easy to forget some basic set up behaviors that could save some heartache in the future. We run into this at Precincts all the time – clients come to us with phones that aren’t behaving properly and we see they are loaded down with apps but lack the basic security and settings management. Taking the time to walk through all your settings and make sure your new device is properly secure is time well spent. Yeah, it’s not as much fun as downloading that game that never worked right on your old phone, but you’ll thank us later.

There is an excellent article by Jessica Dolcourt in the How To section of the Cnet.com site in which she lays out the basic first steps everyone should take when they set up a new phone. Great stuff. Take a look and follow her suggestions before you download another app.

Six Thing Every New Phone Owner Should Do First

Agent Derek has been removing techno-stress from the lives of his Geek Squad clients since 2005. When not providing remote help as an Online Support Agent, he likes to take to the road on a vintage motorcycle for adventures through Ohio country highways.

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Categories: iPhone | Smartphone | Technology

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Monday, December 23, 2013

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Last Minute Tech Gift Ideas

By Agent Tanya B.

So, you’ve done it again. You waited until the eleventh hour to take care of those hard gift decisions. Yeah, you figured something would jump out of some TV or online ad, it would be the perfect thing and your problems would be solved. No such luck.

Agent Kate B. was recently interviewed by the folks at KION TV in Monterey, CA and KCOY of the Central Coast of California about what’s hot in tech gifts this year and suggestions for gifts under $50. She gave a nice breakdown – tablets are hot, tablet, phone and camera accessories make good gifts under $50, as do electric razors, small kitchen appliances, and video games. A bit of last minute shopping advice we thought might be useful, so here’s a link to the interview:

Tech Smart Interview with Kate Burroughs
http://youtu.be/Ejt8_MhjP_k

Agent Tanya B. has been a woman of technology since 2009. When she steps away from her role maintaining the Geeksquad.com website, Tanya is either at the gym, walking her dog, or gaming with the other Agent B. Having moved to corporate from Florida last spring, she’s trying really hard to not complain about the cold too much.

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Categories: Home Remedies | News and Events

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Friday, December 20, 2013

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Travelling With Your Tech

By Agent Williams

Like people all over the world, we Agents often find ourselves travelling to get together with our friends and family over the holidays. And, being more tech-dependent than the average citizen, one of our main concerns is what combination of devices and accessories will we be able to take with us. Sure, Agents travelling over-land can error on the side of caution and fill up the backseat with extra batteries and cables. But those of us who need to grab our boarding passes and stand in the airport security line have decisions to make. Considering that we generally think tech belongs in carry on luggage, weight also becomes an issue.

As the travel season approaches, there are some lively debates in the breakroom about how many screens a person really needs access to over a long holiday weekend. There is nothing worse than grabbing the wrong charger when you are heading out the door. It’s easy to pack enough underwear – making sure you have sufficient storage media is another story.

I ran across an article on TechHive with some excellent advice on packing tech for travel. It’s going to help me when I get ready to head out to the airport – hope it’s useful to you too.

Travel Tips: What You Can’t Leave Behind

Agent Williams joined the ranks of Geek Squad in 2007, earning the badge number #13337 and the alias Agent Leeet Sauce. Now Agent Williams protects the internetz from the Geek Squad Magic Castle. When he’s not policing unruly technology he can be found making music or riding his imaginary pet unicorn.

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Categories: Computing | Home Remedies | How To | iPhone | iPod | Laptop | Smartphone | Tablet

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Wednesday, December 18, 2013

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Online Shopping During the Holidays, Part 2: Scamming in the Wireless World

By Agent Tanya B.

With the increasing use of Wi-Fi technology and the adoption of social media tools at all levels, we are starting to see some new scams and pirating techniques. Be aware of the following when you are transacting business online.

 

Fake hotspots

In the wireless world, web access is something we all take for granted. Our tablets and smartphones are able to find available wireless networks so easily that we can get lulled into a false sense of security. One of the dangers of connecting to a public wireless network is that it might be set up solely to give some scammer access to your computer.

It is fairly easy for a criminal to use a laptop to broadcast a fake Wi-Fi hotspot masquerading as the access zone of a coffee shop or the login page of a popular wireless service provider like Verizon or AT&T. Once an unsuspecting user is connected to this hotspot, the criminal can mine the user’s computer for banking, credit card or password information. Fake hotspots are a growing concern for wireless users, especially in busy public spaces like airports, coffee shops and libraries.

The best way to avoid being a victim of one of these wireless scams is to make sure your device is not set to connect automatically to non-preferred networks. That way, you’ll see a list of available networks when you boot up your computer and be able to choose a legitimate one (if one is available). If you have any questions about which is the right network, check with someone who works at the location you are logging in from.  Also, avoid doing any banking or shopping on public Wi-Fi networks. If you absolutely must, make sure the network is secure.

Links in messages

Most of us have learned to be careful about clicking on a link sent to us via email. With the growing popularity of social media platforms, email is no longer the only way for our friends and colleagues to send us messages. Facebook instant messages, Instagram “likes,” and “tweets” on Twitter allow us to interact with others in new, convenient and immediate ways.

Unfortunately, the scammers are on social media too — and they use it to distribute “bots” to take over users’ computers in order to send spam email. How do bots get on your computer? Well, remember that irresistable link you clicked on the other day? Yep, that’s the culprit. Because messaging on social media platforms is so instantaneous and mobile, many of us don’t think before we click.

Treat links in tweets and Facebook instant messages the same way you would treat a link in an email. The URL-shortening services that let Twitter users share links give the bad guys the opportunity to hide their original URL, making it even harder to identify malicious addresses. If you get a tweet with what looks like an interesting link for a “free iPad” or some other unbelievable offer, go check the profile of the person who sent it out. If that person is following thousands of people and no one is following them, it’s a bot.

You should always be careful with links in Facebook messages. We’ve all had FB friends who have had their accounts hacked. Treat links in instant messages the same way you treat links in emails – confirm the source and make sure the link is safe.

Banks don’t send texts

Speaking of instantaneous messaging, text messages are increasingly used by fraudsters to gain access to people’s financial information. Scammers will send messages out pretending to be from the recipient’s bank or credit card company, asking them to call “right away” to resolve some issue. When the person responds to the “special” number in the email, they are asked to “confirm their identity” by revealing account information that the scammer will then use to access the person’s account.

Other texts may appear to be from major retailer telling the recipient that they have won a gift card to the store. When they call to claim their prize, the scammer asks for an account address or social security number to confirm the winner’s identity. Or, they might ask for a credit card to pay the “shipping and handling” to have the prize sent to them.

These cons are new approaches to “phishing” scams that been around the online world practically since the first email was sent. These “smishing” scams (SMS Phishing) use the brief, ubiquitous nature of texting to nudge the unsuspecting and harried consumer to put themselves in a position to be pressured by the con artist to reveal important information.

Banks and retailers might send your offers by text message, but they would never ask for your account number or personal information as part of that transaction. If you receive a message that says it’s from your bank or a big name store, it is always best to call source directly at a number that is publicly available. It is also a good idea to check with the Better Business Bureau to see if this scam shows up on their database. The folks at snopes.com also maintain a list of current scams. Their website is a necessary stop for anyone who suspects they have been targeted by scammers. (Plus, it’s kind of fun to read.)

In general, be very careful about volunteering information about you, your location and any financial institutions you use to make online payments when you are out in cyberspace. And keep an eye on your accounts. Don’t wait for the end-of–the-month statement. Get in the habit of checking your bank account or credit card statement online every day or so, particularly when you’ve been doing a lot of shopping, to make certain all the charges are correct.

Resources

Agent Tanya B. has been a woman of technology since 2009. When she steps away from her role maintaining the Geeksquad.com website, Tanya is either at the gym, walking her dog, or gaming with the other Agent B. Having moved to corporate from Florida last spring, she’s trying really hard to not complain about the cold too much.

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Categories: Computing | Security Threat Alert | Technology | Wireless Networking

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Thursday, December 12, 2013

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Online Shopping During the Holidays, Part 1: Let’s Be Safe Out There

By Agent Tanya B.

As the holiday shopping season ramps up, a lot of us are on the lookout for good deals on gifts for family and friends. With all the shopping available online these days, maximizing your gift budget is as easy as firing up your smartphone and hitting your favorite shopping site.

 

Free shipping offers for online purchases makes even easier. All of us are running around enough as it is during the holiday season, so we go online to take the pressure off. The deals seem to be out there, it’s easy to comparison shop and the occasionally crazy online bargains make it seem too good to be true…

…until you find that great deal was really a scam.

Con artists — like the Grinch – are always active around the holidays. People have their wallets out, are looking for bargains, and often feel like doing some good by donating to a worthy cause or two. Back in Grandpa’s day, the focus of the con was on separating the mark (victim) from their money. Many of today’s rip-offs are based on tried-and-true scamming techniques — burying the real cost of a product in the fine print, masquerading as a charity, promising a discount if you’ll just “take a few minutes to fill out our short survey” – with a new twist. Online scams generally target the identity, bank account and credit card information of the unsuspecting web user. After all, with the right kind of information, the mark’s money could be in the scammer’s possession long before the victim knows anything was compromised. (Today’s scams are about data, not dollars.)

Security Tips

To help you keep your holiday shopping on the Internet secure, follow these simple rules:

  • Research “too good to be true” sites or offers.
    Do some research on the company making that “too-good-to-be-true” offer.Run a Google search on the company. (Snopes.com is a great resource for this). Try to find their main website, and take a spin through it. Give them a call, even. If anything about it seems wrong or indirect, it would be best to take your business elsewhere.
  • Only make purchases from secure websites.
    Look at the URL of the page you are on before you put in your payment information. Secure site URLs will begin with “https” (or on some occasions “shttp”). Additionally, some browsers will display a closed padlock in the URL bar of secure sites. Be sure the site is secure before you start the purchase.
  • Use strong passwords on banking and financial online accounts.
    For tips on constructing a secure password, take a look at this Tech Tip on our main website.
  • Whenever possible, use a credit card rather than a debit card.
    If a scammer gains access to your account, it will be much easier to reverse fraudulent charges to a credit card. Restoring money to your back account that was stolen by someone using your debit card is much more difficult, and until they reverse the charges you are left holding the bag.
  • Only shop using your own computer or smartphone.
    Many browsers automatically hold onto information you enter into purchase form boxes – exactly the kind of information that would cost you if it were to fall into the wrong hands. Be sure you click on the sign out or log off button of any merchant’s site after your make your purchase.
  • Avoid shopping on public Wi-Fi networks.
    Although one of the advantages of online shopping is being able to do it at your corner coffee shop, it is never a good idea to use a public network to shop or bank. Not only are you susceptible to having your banking keystrokes hijacked (see below), but entering that information in a public place would allow an alert thief an over-the-shoulder look at your name, account number and/or password. (Side note: you also want to make sure to password-protect your home Wi-Fi network. Not only will this keep your neighbors from using your account, but it also helps prevent scammers from planting malware on your devices that would let them monitor your activity.)
  • Do not save your credit card information on the merchant’s web site.
    Legitimate retailers are very good at handling this kind of information, but you increase your chances of being a victim of cybercrime by leaving this critical information with people who don’t really need it. I timed myself once and, including getting my credit card out of my wallet, it took me less than 60 seconds to input my credit card information into the purchase page of a web site. From a security standpoint, it is time well-spent.
  • Be sure you understand the return, refund, and shipping and handling policies before you place your order.
    Some online retailers take advantage of the fact that they have no physical presence to make returns and refunds difficult. They don’t blatantly lie about it, but some drag their feet and become unresponsive once they have your money and the product is delivered. Having their written policies in hand can be helpful in case of any disputes.

Resources

Agent Tanya B. has been a woman of technology since 2009. When she steps away from her role maintaining the Geeksquad.com website, Tanya is either at the gym, walking her dog, or gaming with the other Agent B. Having moved to corporate from Florida last spring, she’s trying really hard to not complain about the cold too much.

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Categories: Computing | Data | How To | iPhone | Security Threat Alert | Smartphone | Technology

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Saturday, November 30, 2013

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Remote Start, or the Joy of a Warm Car

By Agent Ron G.

Most people who live in the northern states know how uncomfortable it can be to get in and start a cold car. The seats are cold and stiff, the steering wheel is like a disk of ice, and the defroster is blowing air with a wind chill. Since the late 1990s many technically-adept (and cold-hating) northerners have managed to avoid the grim reality of “warming up the car” by installing remote starters in their vehicles. Being able to start your car from the warmth of your house or office with the push of a button eliminated what was, for some of us at least, the worst part of winter.

It didn’t take long for some of us to discover that what works with a cold car also works with a hot car. Sticky seats, a steering wheel hot as a frying pan and a cooling system that blows scorching air is at least as unpleasant as a freezing-cold vehicle. As it turns out, remote starters are not just for northerners in winter any more.

Over the last decade or so the kinks of remote start technology have been worked out and additional features have been added to make the functionality even more useful. Following is a breakdown of the four general types of remote start devices available on the market.

Basic Remote Start
The simplest systems allow you to do one thing – use a remote to start your car. Many of these systems work from up to 1,000 feet away. After starting the vehicle and allowing it to warm up, you enter the car by using your door key or the keyless entry remote that came with your vehicle. Before choosing this kind of system, you may want to check to make sure your factory keyless entry remote will unlock your vehicle if it is running. Some factory-installed entry systems are designed to not work when the ignition is on.

Remote Start with Keyless Entry
The next step up is combining remote start and keyless entry capabilities in one remote. These systems allow you to start your car and unlock your warm car using the same remote. Getting rid of that remote for the factory installed keyless entry system may be worth it, as most of us are looking for a less-bulky key ring.

Two-way Remote Start
Wouldn’t it be nice if you didn’t have to look out the window to make sure your vehicle started on command? With a two-way system, a flashing light on your remote is triggered when your vehicle starts. Some systems feature a remote that also emits a tone when your car starts. These systems are great for people who often have to park in spots they cannot easily see from their house or workplace. Top-of-the-line two-way systems can work from as far as a mile away, and their remotes feature a small screen that provides the car’s status (locked/unlocked, running/not running).

Remote Start and Security System
Combining remote start capability with a vehicle alarm system is the height of car comfort and convenience. These systems allow you to start your vehicle remotely while giving you the peace of mind of a full-featured car alarm system. Some systems add two-way communication to the mix, notifying you when your vehicle has started and alerting you if your alarm system is triggered. Top-of-the-line systems feature a small screen on your remote that provides you with information on your car’s status – whether it is locked or unlocked, running or not running and notifying you if the alarm system has been triggered.

For more details and specifics about products on the market today, visit the Best Buy Remote Start page here.

Installing a remote start system is complicated and (if you don’t know what you are doing) potentially dangerous. The last thing anyone wants is to have their car start up on its own. We highly recommend you have one of our Autotechs discuss the systems with you and install the one you choose. Find out more about our remote start install services here.

Agent Ron G. has been battling the forces of unruly technology run amok since 2001, prior to Geek Squad’s acquisition of Best Buy. When not busy creating video & technical training content for Geek Squad Agents in the field, Agent Ron enjoys home brewing, international travel, sketch writing, and learning how to cook new cuisines.

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Categories: Automotive

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Tuesday, November 26, 2013

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No, Geek Squad Did Not Analyze the Christmas Tree App (Hoax alert)

By Agent Derek M

About three years ago, a message began circulating in cyberspace saying that Geek Squad had discovered a Facebook app called “the Christmas Tree App” and we thought it was “one of the worst viruses ever.” This was a hoax.

At that time Geek Squad reached out through our social media presence and various hoax debunking sites to say that we had never investigated any Christmas-tree-related Facebook apps. Because we never looked into it, we couldn’t have determined the extent to which it could be dangerous to Facebook users.

The problem with internet hoaxes like these are that they flare back up again on occasion. That particular hoax email made the rounds again in 2011, and we reached out again through social media and this blog at that time. While we didn’t hear much about this email hoax last year, it seems to be making a comeback, so we thought it would be a good time to reach out  on this topic again.

Let’s make this clear: Geek Squad has never formally investigated any Facebook app that involved Chrismas trees, nor have we identified it as the source of any infections in any tech cases we have solved. This does not automatically mean that the “Christmas Tree App”, if you find one on Facebook, is ok to use.

As a general rule, if it’s not 100% necessary for you to use an application and you can’t verify that the developer is trustworthy, you will want to do some research before using it. There are a number of approaches users can take to keep from installing nefarious apps on Facebook. Start by looking through the Facebook Security page for tips on keeping your profile information secure.

Any Facebook application that you install or use on your profile has access to your personal information and friends list, so make sure you’re only giving applications and people you trust access to your personal info.

As always, if you are dealing with any undesired computer symptoms, seek help from a computer professional as soon as possible. If you notice any signs of your Facebook account being compromised or sending out messages you didn’t intend to send, it could be a signal that your computer may be infected, and you should seek professional assistance.

Agent Derek has been removing techno-stress from the lives of his Geek Squad clients since 2005. When not providing remote help as an Online Support Agent, he likes to take to the road on a vintage motorcycle for adventures through Ohio country highways.

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Categories: Computing | Facebook | Security Threat Alert

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Thursday, November 14, 2013

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Taking Your Holiday Lights to the Next Level

By Agent Ron G.

The Holidays are nearly here once more. Many of our friends and neighbors are beginning to decorate their home exteriors to celebrate the season, and we Agents are no different. Of course, we also enjoy using our technical know-how to give our holiday displays that extra little bit of added sparkle — using light controllers, sequencers and solid state hard drives to bring it to the next level.

About a year ago, Agent Derek M contributed a series of how-to posts to this blog about setting up outdoor light displays.  While originally written for Halloween light displays, we thought the information might be useful as we prepare our outdoor decorations for the holidays.

Tech Up the Holidays: Building Out Your Light Display (Part 1)
Using a light controller and a PC to choreograph your light display.

Tech Up the Holidays: Building Out Your Light Display (Part 2)
Setting up scheduling and sequencer software used to coordinate your controller and PC.

Tech Up the Holidays: Building Out Your Light Display (Part 3)
Choosing the right lights and integrating sound into your display.

Additionally, here’s Derek’s suggested links for those that want to take their displays to the next level:

WowLights Productions
The lighting and product supplier where he gets a lot of his equipment.

Light-O-Rama
A manufacturer and retailer of advanced lighting systems.

Between Derek’s posts and the links listed above, you now know enough to be dangerous — so get out there and put that knowledge to good use, bringing joy to all the neighborhood kids (and showing up their parents).

Agent Ron G. has been battling the forces of unruly technology run amok since 2001, prior to Geek Squad’s acquisition of Best Buy. When not busy creating video & technical training content for Geek Squad Agents in the field, Agent Ron enjoys home brewing, international travel, sketch writing, and learning how to cook new cuisines.

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Categories: Home Remedies | How To | Technology

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Wednesday, November 6, 2013

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Urban Legends and Facebook Graphic Search: Telling Truth from Fiction

By Agent Ron G.

One of my favorite things about Facebook is that it helps me keep up with my family & friends. I’ve traveled a lot in my life, and lived in other states and overseas — so Facebook allows us to share a little bit in each other’s lives. Whether sharing pictures of kids, trips & pets, or sharing life experiences as they happen, it generally let’s each of us know what’s going on, and helps keep us close.

Mark Twain once said  “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.” Never has this been easier than online — especially when it comes to fears of others infringing on their privacy. I was taking a spin through my Facebook feed not long ago and ran across this post from a few of my friends:

Hello to all of you who are on my list of contacts of Facebook. I would like to ask a favor of you…. You may not know that Facebook has changed its privacy configuration once again. Thanks to the new “Graphic app”, any person on FB anywhere in the world can see our photos, our “likes” and our “comments”. During the next two weeks, I am going to keep this message posted and I ask you to do the following and comment “DONE”. Those of my friends who do not maintain my information in private will be eliminated from my list of friends, because I want the information I share with you, my friends, to remain among my friends and not be available to the whole world. I want to be able to publish photos of my friends and family without strangers being able to see them, which is what happens now when you choose “like” or “comment”. Unfortunately we cannot change this configuration because FB has made it like this.

  1. So, please, place your cursor over my photo that appears in this box (without clicking) and a window will open.
  2. Now move the cursor to the word “Friends”, again without clicking and then on “Settings”.
  3. Un-check “Life Events” and “Comments and Like”. That way my activity with my family and friends will no longer be made public.
  4. Now, copy and paste this text on your own wall (do not “share” it!). Once I see it published on your page, I will un-check the same.

Thanks for helping me out with this!!

Now, the kneejerk reaction to something like that is fear — followed by reposting of the same message, and an almost automatic following of whatever advice is given in the post… which got me thinking. This seems somewhat conspiracy theorist territory to me — so I needed to check it out.

How did I do that? By simply copying a segment of the text and Googling it — along with the word “Scam”. And just like that — BINGO! We have a confirmation: it’s simply yet another online urban legend.

New privacy concerns about Facebook seem to surface every time they change their platform in any way. This message contains some inaccuracies and construes the recent changes FB made to their search capability as a feature allowing strangers to see things we just as soon they didn’t. I discovered the new Graphic Search works the same as all other Facebook functionality – it is controlled by the sharing settings you set in the Privacy Settings and Tools section of the site.

First thing I discovered is that there is no “Graphic app.” I assume the message is referring to Facebook’s new Graphic Search capability because that is the only recent upgrade of the platform to use the term “Graphic.” The fact is Graphic Search just makes it easier for users to find content on Facebook using regular language-based search and some added filters. As a more effective search engine, it makes it easier for users to find content that they would have had to spend a little more time digging around for in the past. But it is not searching content that wasn’t available to users already.

More good information about Graphic Search is available from Facebook here.

If you, like my friends, are concerned with who can see content from or about you on Facebook, then go to the Privacy Shortcuts menu in the toolbar in the upper-right-hand-corner of your FB feed page (the padlock image) and adjust your settings accordingly. (check out this article about managing your privacy on Facebook on Graham Cluley’s security blog. )

How can you avoid being taken in by scammers like this in the future? Well, if something sounds too good to be true (or too horrible, for that matter), head over to www.snopes.com and look it up there (or type “Snopes” and whatever the topic is in your search bar). Chances are, you’ll find out that it wasn’t actually true — and you can avoid the embarrassment that often follows.

Agent Ron G. has been battling the forces of unruly technology run amok since 2001, prior to Geek Squad’s acquisition of Best Buy. When not busy creating video & technical training content for Geek Squad Agents in the field, Agent Ron enjoys home brewing, international travel, sketch writing, and learning how to cook new cuisines.

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Categories: Computing | Facebook | How To | Security Threat Alert | Technology

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Wednesday, October 23, 2013

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Storage Drive Failure on 2012-2013 MacBook Air Laptops (and a Fix)

By Agent Ryan S.

If you own an Apple MacBook Air laptop sold between June 2012 and June 2013, you should know that flash storage drives in those particular models occasionally fail – and that Apple has issued a press release saying they will replace all affected drives free of charge.

To help users determine if their drive is affected, Apple has created a firmware update for MacBook Air users. For instructions on how to run the firmware update, visit the Replacement Program page on the Apple website here. (Go ahead and do this… We’ll wait.)

So, you ran the firmware update and found your machine is affected? Then you have no time to waste – it’s essential that you back up your data to the Cloud or an external drive immediately. (The drive failure is unpredictable and we’d hate to see you lose any of those pics or files on your machine.)

We recommend you keep your data backed up regularly until you can get the flash drive replaced. Not sure how to do this? Check the following link for more details: http://www.apple.com/support/backup/. Our Agents can also help you figure out the right data backup solution and routine as well to help ensure your data is never in danger of being lost forever.

Note: If your computer needs to have the drive replaced, don’t install updates or new software, and use the computer as little as possible. Such actions could destabilize the drive and you could end up losing your data.

The good news? Apple (or an Apple Authorized Service Provider, like Geek Squad) will replace the drive free of charge. If your MacBook Air is part of this recall, bring it in to the nearest Geek Squad Precinct. Our Agents will ship it off to Geek Squad City – the largest computer repair location in the world – to replace the drive as part of this program. (For more details, give us a call at 1-800-433-5778.)

When you get the MacBook Air back, the new drive will be blank, so you’ll need to reinstall the Mac operating system and software before using it again. To do that, make sure you have the installation media for any software you currently have on the MacBook Air in order to get it back to the way you like it.

Agent Ryan S, Badge #23, has been with the Geek Squad for 16 years. He was fixing Macs before they were cool. Remember those old monochrome displays? Ryan does. Oh, and the plot of the Matrix is based on a service call he went on in 1997.

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Categories: Computing | Laptop | News and Events

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